Ordo August 21 – 27


TRINITY XII, Semidouble w/commem. of St. Jane Frances de Chantal

Sunday August 21

All as in the Psalter & Ordinary at all Hours.

Matins: ix Lessons. Nocturn I: Beginning of the Book of Wisdom. Nocturn II: St. Ambrose. Nocturn III: Luke 10, 23 & St. Bede. Te Deum is said. Nothing of Octave & St. Jane.

Lauds: commem. of Octave & St. Jane. No Preces, no Common Commem.

Vespers: commem. of the Octave day of the Assumption followed by a commem. of St. Jane.

Octave Day of the Assumption w/commem. of Sts. Timothy, Hippolytus & Symphorian

Monday August 22

Simple Kalendar ignore Sts. Timothy, Hippolyuts  &Symphorian. At Vespers ignore St. Philip Beniti. 

All as in the Ordinary & Psalter except:

Matins: Inv. & Hymn of the Feast. IX Lessons. Nocturn I occurrent Scripture & V/R from feria; II and III Nocturn as p. F213-215. Lesson ix if Sts. Timothy, Hippolytus & Symphorian. Te Deum.

Lauds: from the Chapter onward of the Asumption w/commem. of Sts. Timothy, Hippolytus & Symphorian.

Vespers: from the Chapter onward of the Assumption w/commem. of St. Philip Beniti.

St. Philip Beniti & Commem. of the Vigil of St. Bartholomew the Apostle

Tuesday August 23

Simple Kalendar ignore St. Philip. All as for Vigils of Apostles from Common I.

All as in the Psalter & Ordinary except:

Matins: III Lessons by Rule 2 (p. xli-xlii). Inv. & Hymn from Common 9. Te Deum.

Lauds: from Chapter onward of the feast using Common 9 w/commem of the Vigil using Table I. No Preces, no Common Commem.

Vespers: all from Common 2 except what is given as proper for St. Bartholomew the Apostle. No Preces, no Common Commem.

SAINT BARTHOLOMEW THE APOSTLE, Double 2nd Class

Wednesday August 24

All as in Common 2 except what is given as proper at all Hours.

Matins IX lessons. Te Deum.

Lauds: no Preces, no Common Commem.

Vespers: all as in Common 2 except what is given as proper & commem. of St. Louis using Table 9a. No Preces, no Common Commem.

St. Louis King & Confessor, Double

Thursday August 25

All as in the Psalter & Ordinary except:

Matins III Lessons using Rule 2. Inv. & Hymn from Common 9.  Te Deum.

Lauds: from Chapter of the Feast using Common 9. No Preces, no Common Commem.

Vespers: from Chapter of the Feast w/ commem. of St. Zephyrinus using Table 5a. No Preces, no Common Commem.

Simple Kalendar: ignore St. Zephyrinus. No Preces but Common Commem. is said.

St. Zephyrinus, Simple

Friday August 26

Simple Kalendar: ferial. Ignore St. Zephyrinus. Dominical Preces at Prime & Common Commem. at Lauds.

All as in the Psalter & Ordinary except:

Matins III Lessons. Second lessons is ii & iii combined, iiird lesson for St. Zephyrinus.

Lauds: from Chapter of the Feast. No Preces but Common Commem. is said.

Vespers: from Chapter onward of St. Joseph using Common 9.

Simple Kalendar, ferial. Office of St. Mary on Saturday.

St. Joseph Calasanza, Double

Saturday August 27

Simple Kalendar ignore St. Joseph. Ferial (Office of St. Mary on Saturday) w/ Dominical Preces at Prime & Common Commem.

All as in the Psalter & Ordinary except:

Matins III Lessons. According to Rule2. Te Deum.

Lauds: from Chapter of the Feast using Common 9. No Preces, no Common Commem.

Vespers: all as for Trinity XIV w/commem of St. Joseph using Common 9c.

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St. Joachim’s Feast


The Orthodox Church has celebrated the feast of St. Joachim for a very long time. Much longer than the Roman rite has celebrated this feast. The feast has always been celebrated by them in close association with the birthday of Our Lady. Only later on in the Middle Ages was this feast introduced into the Western Church. At times the feast could be found celebrated the day after the Octave of the Nativity of the BVM on September 16th, but it was also celebrated on the day following the feast of the Conception of the BVM on December 9th.

In the early 16th century Pope Julian II introduced the feast into the Roman Kalendar and gave it a Major Double rank. The feast was located on March 20-ieth, the day following the feast of St. Joseph. Less than 5 decades after it had been introduced into the Roman Kalendar the feast was removed from the Roman Kalendar. This was done under the rising influence of rationalism which failed to understand hagiography and thus desired to remove the feast because of its lack of historical foundation. Mere historicity – of course – was never the point of hagiography in the first place. Legends of the Saints were never “biographies” in the modern sense.

In 1622 Pope Gregory XV reintroduced the feast of St. Joachim into the Roman Kalendar as a double and it has been featured in the Roman Kalendar ever since. In 1738 Pope Clement XII transferred the feast to the Sunday following the Assumption of his daughter (St. Mary) and gave restored it the rank of major double. The year 1879 saw Pope Leo XIII (who was himself baptized with the name Joachim) raised the feast of Joachim (and that of Anne) to the rank of a double of the second class. In the Anglican Breviary – which is modelled after the 1911 Pian Breviary) the feast of St. Joachim is still a double of the second class but it is no longer celebrated on a Sunday. The feast now – quite appropriately – follows immediately upon the feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin and Mother of God St. Mary, Joachim’s daughter.

The close association of Joachim and his daughter is also expressed in the fact that a commemoration of the Assumption is absent from the office today. Because St. Joachom’s feast is ranked as a double of the second class, and the Octave of the Assumption is a Common Octave there is no commemoration of the Octave in today’s Office. This is fitting in that in a way the feast of St. Joachim is a celebration of his daughter. Feasts that are of the same nature, or more precisely, that celebrate the same person are not both commemorated at the same time. Joachim is celebrated precisely because he is the father of the BVM! The character of St. Joachim is that of father. Not just any father, but the father of the one who gave birth to the Godman. Joachim refers to his daughter, Mary in her turn, refers to Jesus Christ. The saints – including St. Mary – always have their ultimate telos or goal in Jesus Christ. After all a saint is nothing more than one in whom Jesus Christ reveals Himself.

Fr. Gregory Wassen

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For the Octave of Assumption


As Christ is Lord, so Mary is Lady and sovereign. He who bends the knee before the Son, kneels before the Mother. At the sound of her name the devils tremble, men rejoice, the Angels glorify God. Mary and Christ are one flesh, one mind, and one love. From the day when it was said “the Lord be with thee,” the grace was irrevocable, the unity inseparable; and in speaking of the glory of the Son and Mother, we must call it not so much a common glory as the self-same glory.

~ Arnold of Bonneval

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Ordo August 14 – 20 Simple Kalendar


NOTE: the Simple Kalendar leaves out a good many feasts. In order to make the kalendar slightly less simple the feasts from the Universal Kalendar could be commemorated at Matins, Lauds & Vespers if so desired. All you need is to add the legend to the last Lesson and find the right Table & Collect for the kind of Saint you wish to commemorate. The Supplement to the Anglican Breviary (the S section) contains feasts from BCP’s around the world and some from Sarum sources.

 

 TRINITY XII

Sunday August 14

Psalms & Ants as in the Psalter & Ordinary at all Hours.

Matins IX Lessons. Inv. & Hymn from Ordinary. Lessons i-vi from C560-561 w/ Responds from Table 3 (C685-686), Lessons vii-ix from C w/ Responds from table 3, followed by Te Deum. Nothing from the Vigil.

Lauds: Ant. Ben. & Collect from C686 followed by common commeoration.

At Prime & Compline no Preces, Athanasian Creed is said at Prime.

Vespers: All as for the Feast of the Assumption (E364), using Common I for what is lacking in the Proper of the Saints. Antiphons & Chapter, from Lauds.

NOTE: A beautiful Collect from the Sarum Use is given on p. E369 and is recommended for use instead of the “We beseech thee” on p. E368. If the Sarum Collect is used it also used throughout the Octave. 

THE ASSUMPTION OF THE B.V.M., Double I Class w/ common Octave.

Monday August 15.

All as for the Feast p. E364-369, whatever is needed from Common 2.

Matins ix Lessons. Nocturn I lessons from Common II of BVM, lessons iv to ix from Proper. Te Deum is said.

Lauds: No comm. commem., no Preces.

At Prime & Compline no Preces, Psalms of Prime I.

Vespers: 2nd Vespers of the Assumption w/commem. of St. Joachim using Propers on p. E370.

SAINT JOACHIM, FATHER OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN, Double II Class.

Tueday August 16.

All as for the Feast p. E370-372, whatever is needed from Common 9.

Matins ix Lessons. Nocturn I lessons from Common 9, lessons iv to ix from Proper. Te Deum is said.

Lauds: No comm. commem., no Preces. V & R as well as Antiphon on Benedictus as at I Vespers no commemoration of the Octave is made at Lauds.

At Prime & Compline no Preces, Psalms of Prime I.

Vespers: 2nd Vespers of St. Joachim, no commemoration of the Octave is made at Vespers. No Common commem. No Preces.

Third Day in the Octave of the Assumption

Wednesday August 17

Psalms & Antiphons at all Hours from the Psalter.

Matins ix Lessons. At all Nocturns lessons are for the Octave p. F202-204 w/Responsories from the Feast. Te Deum is said.

Lauds: from Chapter onward of the Feast w/commemoration of the Octave Day of St. Lawrence (E374). No common commem. No Preces.

At Prime & Compline no Preces.

Vespers: from Chapter onward of the Feast (Vespers II).

Fourth Day in the Octave of the Assumption

Thursday August 18.

Psalms & Antiphons at all Hours from the Psalter.

Matins ix Lessons. At all Nocturns lessons are for the Octave p. F205-207 w/Responsories from the Feast. Te Deum is said.

Lauds: from Chapter onward of the Feast No common commem. No Preces.

At Prime & Compline no Preces.

Vespers: from Chapter onward of the Feast (Vespers II).

Fifth Day in the Octave of the Assumption

Friday August 19

Psalms & Antiphons at all Hours from the Psalter.

Matins ix Lessons. At all Nocturns lessons are for the Octave p. F207-208 w/Responsories from the Feast. Te Deum is said.

Lauds: from Chapter onward of the Feast. No common commem. No Preces.

At Prime & Compline no Preces.

Vespers: all as for the Feast of St. Bernard using Common 8 for what is not given at the Proper of the Saints w/commem. of the Octave of the Assumption (using the propers from II Vespers).

St. Bernard of Clairvaux, Double.

Saturday August 20.

At all Hours all is said as given in Common 8, except what is provided as Proper (p. E376-377).

Matins: ix lessons. Te Deum is said.

Lauds: no Common commem.

At Prime & Compline: No Preces.

Vespers: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary. From Chapter onward of Trinity XIII (V/R & Antiphon on Magnificat p. C564) w/commem. of St. Bernard.

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Fourth Day in the Octave of St. Laurence


From the Monastic Breviary translated by the late Fr. Jack Whitbrock:

WAS it said to Saint Lawrence: thou shouldest not have spent the treasures of the Church, sold sacramental vessels? It is necessary that someone should do this work with sincere faith and clear foresight. Indeed if anyone puts it to his own profit, it is a crime: but if he spends it on the poor, or redeems a captive, it is mercy. For no one can say, Why does the poor man live? No one can question why captives have been redeemed. No one can make an accusation because a temple of God has been built. No one can be indignant, because space is allowed for the human remains of the faithful: none can grieve, that the departed rest in Christian burial. In these three kinds of ways even dedicated vessels of the Church may be broken up, melted down, sold.

~ Lesson iij at Matins.

Concerning Sts. Hippolytus & Cassian:

HIPPOLYTUS, having been baptized by Saint Lawrence, was taking the Eucharist in his own house, when he was arrested and brought to the Emperor Valerian, and being questioned by him about the profession of his religion, freely professed that he was a Christian. Therefore he was beaten with clubs: and when his faith was found the more constant under these blows, he was tempted with gifts and the promise of honours. And since all these words were in vain, he was handed over to the Prefect to be killed. He, coming to Hippolytus’ home to confiscate his goods, found that all his fanily was Christian: and failing to deter them from their Christian faith, he first had Concordia, Hippolytus’ nurse, beaten with leaden whips, as she was encouraging the others, and then ordered the rest to be killed outside the Tiburtine gate. Hippolytus was dragged by wild horses through places full of thorns and thistles until with lacerated body he gave up his spirit to God, and together with the others was buried by the presbyter Justin at the Veran field. On the same day, at the Forum of Sylla, Cassian the martyr was most cruelly tormented: for with his hands tied behind his back he was handed over to be pierced and tortured with the iron pens of the boys whom he used to teach. And as their strength was less, so much the greater and longer was the pain of his martyrdom, and his palm the more glorious.

Lesson xij, if the Fourth day would be on a Sunday.

Fr. Gregory Wassen

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Octave of St. Lawrence


From the pre-1911 Monastic Office as translated by the (late) Fr. Jack Whitbrock

 
(From a Homily by St. Augustine)
HERE you have the meaning of the words, If any man serve me, let him follow me. But with what result? what wages? what reward? And where I am, he says, there shall also my servant be. Let him be; freely loved, that so the reward of the service done may be, to be with him. For where will one be well, apart from him, or when will one be able to be unhappy, in his company? Hear it still more plainly: If any man serve me, him will my Father honour. And what will be the honour, but to be with his Son? For of what he said before, Where I am, there shall also my servant be, we may understand as giving the explanation, when he says here, Him will my Father honour. For what greater can await an adopted son than to be with the Only-begotten; not, indeed, made equal to his divinity, but made a partaker of his eternity?
 
~ I Nocturn, lesson ii.
 
Before the 1911 Reforms in the Church of Rome there was no such thing as a Simple Octave. The Octave of St. Laurence was a Semidouble. St. Clare – though present in the MBM – was not present in the latest Sarum Kalendar before the Protestant Reformation in England. It seemed fitting that a reminder of the ancient feast and the ancient octave of the feast be given today.
 
In the lesson above St. Augustine beautifully expresses what deification is all about. As adopted sons of the Father of Jesus Christ, we will never be “consubstantial” with the Father. We will, however, be “partakers” (participants) of that very Eternity which units Father and Son! This truth could certainly sustain Christians who also risk their lives simply by being Christian. It should also sustain us, though we do not suffer martyrdom, that suffer an increasing isolation, alienation, and discrimination in our “free world” simply for being a Christian.
 
Fr. Gregory Wassen
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Sacrifice


” R. The Deacon Laurence was counted worthy to be a burnt-offering, and while he was burning he did not deny the Lord x Therefore he was made a sacrifice of praise.
V. When he was laid on the gridiron he did not deny god; and at the touch of fire he confessed Christ. Therefore he was made a sacrifice of praise. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost. Therefore he was made a sacrifice of praise.
 
~ Long Responsorie viii, Matins of St. Laurence, Monastic Breviary Matins.
 
It is sometimes assumed that “sacrifice of praise” is mere words. Words of prayer, certainly, but not an actual “sacrifice” at all. The Mass is therefore a sacrifice only as words offered to God in prayer. The Monastic Office proves this wrong. The Mass is a as real a sacrifice as St. Laurence’s was a real sacrifice. The Gregorian Canon – in which St. Laurence makes an appearance – also proves the Reformers of the 16th and 20-ieth centuries wrong. Though words of prayer are certainly sacrificial and even a sacrifice, they do not exhaust the concept of sacrifice.
 
Jesus, speaking of Himself in today’s Gospel reading, said that the corn of wheat must fall into the ground and die for it bring forth much fruit. It is precisely by the Sacrifice of the Mass that this corn is offered (with wine) to the Father as a sacrifice of praise and has brought forth much fruit. That is salvation is continuously brought to people all over the world through the preaching of the Gospel and the distribution of the Sacraments (especially the Mass).
 
But sacrifice is more than martyrdom, and more than the Mass. The Divine Office too is a sacrifice. The evening Psalm 141 (Thursday Vespers in the Monastic Office) tells us that the very prayer offered here is a sacrifice. In other words: the divine office itself is a sacrifice offered to God. But here too it is Jesus Christ (the Word of God) offering Himself (our prayers consist mostly of Scripture) to us, and we then in our prayers offer the Word (Psalms, chapters, antiphons, hymns) back to God (the Father).
 
 
May the blessed Levite Laurence give us a deeper and truer understanding of “sacrifice” !
 
Fr. Gregory Wassen
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