Ordo for Lent 2 (based on the Simple Kalendar)


Sunday – March 1st

I Vespers: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent. Commem. of St. David (Table 7a). Matins: All as for Sunday in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent (remember no Alleluia‘s & Te Deum in Lent). Lauds & Hours: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent (Lauds 2) w/commem. of St. David (Table 7b) Preces are said at all Hours (the Preces are said at all Hours throughout Lent, kneeling). II Vespers: all as in the Psalter for Lent w/commem of St. Chad p. S19 (Table 7a).

Monday – March 2nd 

Monthly Office of the Dead & Requiem suggested instead of Daily Office below. If the suggestion is followed than after Sunday Vespers there immediately follows the Vespers of the Dead. Matins & Lauds are from the Office of the Dead (p. H1).

Matins: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent w/commem. of St. Chad (adding Legend of St. Chad to the last lesson of Matins). Lauds & Hours: All as in the Psalter (Lauds 2) & Ordinary for Lent. Collect “Grant we beseech” & commem. of St. Chad (Table 7b). Vespers: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent. Collect: “Assist us ..” & commem. of St. Aelred p. S20 (Table 10a)

Tuesday – March 3d

 Matins: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent add Legend of St. Aelred to last lesson of Matins. Lauds & Hours: All as in the Psalter (Lauds 2) & Ordinary for Lent. Collect “O Most merciful” & commem. of St. Aelred (Table 10b) Vespers: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent. Collect: “We beseech thee ..” & commem. of St. Casimir (Table 9a).

Wednesday – March 4th

Matins: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent w/commem. of St. Casimir (adding Legend of St. Casimir to the last lesson of Matins). Lauds & Hours: All as in the Psalter (Lauds 2) & Ordinary for Lent. Collect “We beseech thee.” Vespers: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent. Collect: “O God, the restorer ..”

Thursday – March 5th

Matins: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent. Lauds & Hours: All as in the Psalter (Lauds 2) & Ordinary for Lent. Collect “Grant us.” Vespers: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent. Collect: “Assist, O Lord” & commem. of Sts. Perpetua & Felicity (Table 13a).

Friday – March 6th

Matins: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent adding the Legend of Sts. Perpetua & Felicity to the last Lesson of Matins. Lauds & Hours: All as in the Psalter (Lauds 2) & Ordinary for Lent. Collect “Almighty God” & commem. of Sts. Perpetua & Felicity (Table 13b). Vespers: all as for the Feast of a Doctor using Common 8 for what is not given as proper w/commem. of the Lenten Feria (use Vespers Collect).

Saturday – March 7th

Matins: all as for the Feast of a Doctor using Common 8 for what is not given as Proper. The Legend is divided at the asterisks into 3 parts for the 2nd Nocturn. Commem. of Lenten Feria instead of Lesson ix ! Lauds & Hours: all as for the feast using Commoin 8 for what is not given as proper w/commem. of Lenten Feria (use Lauds Collect). Vespers: all as in the Psalter for Saturday in Lent w/commem. of St. Thomas (no Preces due to the commemoration a double feast, Table 8c). 

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The purpose of worship


Lauren Pristas, writing about the collects contained in the Old and New Roman Missals, reminds us that “we are shaped by our worship” (Collects of the Roman Missals, location 186 Kindle edition). This is well-known it seems since I have heard it said and confirmed many times over by many different people. What I do not often hear is what Pristas writes a few passages on: “The formation 0f which we speak is not the purpose of worship but its effect …” This is a helpful and very necessary reminder that even though worship catechizes that is not the purpose of worship. Again Pristas: “… it is unfitting to ascribe any utilitarian purpose to worship, for in true worship the human person adores and honors God for his own sake.” In other words: worship is not primarily for us but it is primarily for God. Worship is not the place for biblical, catechetical, or other studies.

This is, of course, not to deny that worship does indeed form and shape us. It most certainly does. The point is that worship was not designed to be catechesis or Bible study. Nor should it be. The opus Dei or “work of God” has two components. The first is the worship and adoration of God for his own sake. The second is, as Pristas wrote, the effect of the first we are shaped and formed by the kind of worship we perform. In other words the work of God is a work we perform to God for his sake, and it is also a work performed on us. For as we worship we are formed and shaped. Our habitual actions will – over time – become character and part of how we think and perceive. Worship is how we are re-created in the Image of God.

This is the point of traditional worship. The times, places and people that have been part of its creation have been “means” by which the Holy Spirit has created this worship or liturgy. The same process is to be recognized behind what we call “tradition” or perhaps even “holy tradition.” In fact, I would argue that it is the process which lies behind the Christian Bible(s). Anyone feeling any unease with changing, re-editing, or correcting a presumably outdated Scripture ought to have equal scruples concerning doing such violence to tradition and our worship. Even if such changes are deemed “necessary” for pastoral, theological, simplification, or any other such reasons (excuses? ).

It has been argued that there is – for example – great didactic value in the new liturgies designed under the direction of Annibale Bugnini. This may very well be so. The same could be said of Thomas Cranmer’s Book of Common Prayer it has great didactic value and no doubt great pastoral sensitivity, theological focus, and simplicity can be claimed for it. It is specifically designed to be so. Chiefly by Dr. Cranmer. In various manuals and introductions to the Book of Common Prayer one can find these claims made by middle of the road, Anglo Catholic, and even Protestant lovers of the Prayer Book. Talking to the various sorts of Anglicans, be they clergy or lay, will provide a very similar result.

And yet …

Is this pastoral sensitivity, theological (namely biblical) focus, and oversee able simplicity really a benefit? Has our worship since the Reformation not been (and for Rome since the Liturgical Revolution) been re-oriented from worship for (toward) God to the interests (no matter how carefully couched) of man? Iow has our liturgy become anthropocentric rather than theocentric? To put it more bluntly and simply: has our worship of God become too much the worship of self? It seems to me that a good case could be made that the Reformation and the Revolution mentioned above had done more damage than good. If such a case convinces us that it is indeed so, than a return to tradition, a return to traditional worship, may very well restore not just the didactic benefits of the (Anglican) Breviary and the (Anglican) Missal but it first and foremost reorients our worship toward God. As worship of God, for God’s sake, it will once again have its “side effect” of recreating us in the Image of God.

Gregory Wassen +

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Ordo AB Advent III


NOTE: remember at Lauds the Antiphons from p. C28-9 & at Prime a 4th Psalm is added!

Wednesday 17: Ember Wednesday

- Matins: ferial C32-3. Lauds: 2 B90-2. Collect: C33.

- Vespers: ferial, O ADONAI. Collect previous Sunday (Ember Day ends after None before Vespers).

Thursday 18: Feria.

- Matins: ferial C33-4. Lauds: 2. Collect: previous Sunday.

- Vespers: ferial, O RADIX JESSE. Collect: previous Sunday.

Friday 19: Ember Friday.

- Matins: ferial C34-5. Lauds: 2 B136-9. Collect: C35.

- Vespers: ferial. O CLAVIS DAVID. Collect: previous Sunday.

Saturday 20: Ember Saturday.

- Matins: ferial C35-6. Lauds: 2 B161-5 (Canticle: Ignis succensus est). Collect: previous Sunday.

- Vespers:  ferial (1st Vespers of the 4th Sunday of Advent), O ORIENS. Collect: C40.

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Saint Etheldreda


Æthelthryth (or Æþelðryþe; about 636 – June 23, 679) is the name for the Anglo-Saxon saint known, particularly in a religious context, as Etheldreda or Audrey. She was an East Anglian princess, a Fenland and Northumbrian queen and Abbess of Ely.

More here: Etheldreda.

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Regarding good work


“Note here how much precaution you must observe with reference to good work. At the beginning of all your works see that you have light in you, so that all your works may be of light and not of darkness. Next, consider carefully whether your light is pure and not darkened; and when you have found that it is good, then finally divide it from darkness, and call the light day, and the darkness night. Then, in the case of your other works which you do in the light, see if these also are good; and do not let any work at all go by without judgment until you know all that you have done. Thus judgment is twofold: the first judgment is that in which light is judged and seen whether it is good, so that it may be divided from darkness; the second judgment is when the works themselves which are done in light are called to judgment, and it is seen that they are also good. And thus at last God rests.”

¬ Hugh of St. Victor, De Sacramentis, Bk. One, Chap. XIV.

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Monastic Office Ordo October 17 – 2014


St. ETHELDREDA ¬ (Virgin not a Martyr)

MBM:

Inv & Hymn p. 131* Pss & Ants as in the Psalter for Friday. Single Lesson p. 1014w/Resp from p. 131* (for a Virgin not a Martyr! ). II Nocturn Lesson 2 Cor. 11, 2 (p. 132*). Collect p. 1915.

MD:

Lauds & Hours: as in the Psalter from Chapter of the Feast using Common of Virgins (p. 47* – ), Collect p. 626.

Vespers: all as for the Feast of St. Luke using Common of Apostles (p. 7*) for what is not given as proper. Commem. of St. Etheldreda (Ant & V/R p. 4*-5* Collect p. 626).

Salve Regina as usual.

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Simple kalendar Ordo for October 17 – 2014


FERIA

Matins: iii Lessons. All as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Friday. Lessons: Maccabees (p. C628-9) w/Resp. from table 5 Fridays (p. C611).

To commemorate St. Etheldreda, as required by the ACC Kalendar, simply add her legend (p. S64-5) to lesson iii.

Lauds & Hours: all as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Friday. Collect from Trinity XVII (p. C691). Suffrage is said, at Prime Dominical Preces.

To commemorate St. Etheldreda use Table 12b, Collect: p. S64. Suffrage is said, and at Prime Dominical Preces.

Vespers: all as for the Feast of St. Luke p. E479 using Common 3 (p. F24) for what is not given as proper. Pss of Vespers 3 (see p. B31). NO Suffrage. Compline of Sunday.

Salve Regina as usual.

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