Ordo Recitandi Februari 18 – 25 (2018)


The Alleluia is omitted from Compline on the Saturday before Septuagesima until Compline on Saturday before Easter. The Laus, tibi Domine is used instead. On double feasts antiphons are said entire before and after the Psalm or Canticle. Responds at Matins are from the Proper of the Season (C-section) unless instructed otherwise. 

 

February 18, Quadragesima, Sunday of I Class, sd.

At Matins, Invit. and Hymn for Lent as in the Ordinary, Antiphons and Psalms as in the Psalter w/Nocturn versicles as there given for Lent. Lessons i-iii p. C209 (1 Corinthians 6), iv-vi p. 211-212 (St. Leo the Great). Responses for Lent as given for the Season. No Te Deum.

At Lauds, Psalms of “Lauds 2” are said. Rest as given in the Proper of the Season (C212-213), commemoration of St. Simeon (Table 5b, collect E101), Beata Dei Genetrix (A6) is said. Dominical Preces are also said. 

At Vespers, Antiphons and Psalms from the Psalter with the Hymn, V/R for Lent as given in the Ordinary. Chapter & Collect from Lauds. Ant. on Magn. C213. Dominial Preces are said. Today, at the end of Vespers, immediately following upon “Thanks be to God” the Vespers of the Dead is said.

February 19, feria (Monday).

The Invit and Hymn at Matins, the Hymn and V/R at Lauds and Vespers, and Brief Lessons at Prime with the Brief Response, and the remaining Hours in both the Sunday and the ferial Office until None of the Saturday before Passion Sunday inclusive, are said daily as given for Lent in the Ordinary, from which are also taken the the Chapter at all the Hours and the Antiphons at each of the lesser Hours on Ferias. 

The bracketed Matins RR, given in place of a repetition RR already used, provide a continuity in the occurrent Scripture which no longer is used as Lessons in Lent and Passiontide exceot on Sundays). 

At Matins. The Antiphons and Psalms of the Feria, with Nocturn Versicle. of Lent, as in the Psalter, which same are always used in the ferial Office until Passiontide. Lessons i-iii St. Matthew & St. Augustine (p. C214-215). 

On this day and any feria thereafter until Wednesday in Holy Week inclusive, Psalms of Lauds 2 are said; and on each Wednesday at Matins the III Nocturn is of scheme 2; and the Antiphons are said as given in the Psalter, except, in Holy eek at Lauds, when they are proper. At Prime a fourth Psalm (which coud not be taken at Lauds) is added. And daily in the ferial Office at all the Hours are said the Peces until Wednesday in Holy Week inclusive. 

At Lauds. All from Ordinary & Psalter. Ant. Ben. & Collect p. C215. At the end of Lauds, immediately following “Thanks be to God” the Matins & Lauds of the Dead are said.

At Vespers. Antiphons (doubled) & Psalms as in the Psalter, from Chapter of the Feast (using Common 11). Commemoration of the Feria: Ant. on Magn. & Collect C215.

February 20 (Tuesday), The Holy Martyrs and Missionaries of Africa, d.

At Matins. By Rule 2 (p. xli-xlii). Inv. & Hymn from Common 11. Pss & Ants from Psalter, single Nocturn w/ Nocturn Versicles for Lent. Lesson i all of the occurent Scripture as one lesson with Season Response, Lesson ii all of the Legend (S16-17) as one lesson with corresponding Response from Common 11, Lesson iii proper Gospel of the Season with Te Deum following.

At Lauds. Pss & Ants (doubled) as in the Psalter (scheme 1). From Chapter onward of the Feast using Common 11. Collect S.17. Commemoration of the feria (C216-17 & V/R A22). On double feasts the Preces are not said. 

At Vespers. From Chapter of the Feast using Common 11. Commem. of the Feria (C217, V/R A41). 

February 21, Ember Wednesday. 

At MatinsThe Antiphons and Psalms of the Feria, with Nocturn Versicle. of Lent, as in the Psalter, which same are always used in the ferial Office until Passiontide. Lessons i-iii St. Matthew & St. Augustine (p. C217-218). 

At Lauds. scheme 2. Pss/antiphons from the Psalter. Ant. on Ben., & Collect from Proper of the Season (C218).

At Vespers. All as on the Feast of Januari 18th omitting the Commemorations there given, except that of St. Paul (Sts. Peter and Paul are always commemorated in each others Offices), with a commem. of the Feria (C218, V/R A41). 

February 22 (Thursday), Feast of St. Peter’s Chair at Antioch, gd.

At Matins. All as for the Feast on Januari 18th. Except the following: the propers on p. E101-103). Lesson ix from the Feria (C218), Te Deum. 

At Lauds. All as on Januari 18th, except propers given for today. Commemoration of St. Paul followed by the commem. of the Feria (C219, V/R A22).

At Vespers. All as for the Feast on Januari 18, except what is given as proper for today (E102), with a commemoration of St. Paul followed by a commemoration of the follwijg feast Table 8a, collect E103). 

February 23 (Friday), St. Peter Damian, d.

 At Matins. By Rule 2. All as in the Ordinary & Psalter, Nocturn Versicles for 3 lessons (B85), Lesson iii of the Ember Friday, Te Deum. 

At Lauds.  Scheme 1. Antiphons (doubled) & Psalms from the Psalter, Chapter, Hymn, Ant. on Benedictus from Common 8, collect from E103. No Preces. Commem. of the Feria C223. 

Penitential Psalms. I suggest that these Psalms immediately follow Lauds but without the Litany since it is used with the Gradual Psalms instead.

At Vespers. All as in Common 2, except what is given as Proper (E104), stanza 2 of the Hymn is from p. E104, commemoration of preceding (Table 8a, E103) and the Lenten Feria (C221, V/R A41).

February 24, (Saturday), ST. MATHIAS THE APOSTLE, d2. 

At Matins. All as in Common 2 except what is given as proper for the Feast (E104-105), lesson ix of the Ember Saturday. Nocturn Versicles as for 9 lessons. Te Deum. 

At Lauds.  All as in Common 2, except the Collect. Commemoration of the Ember Saturday C223, V/R A22. 

At Vespers. Antiphons & Psalms as in the Psalter & Ordinary for Lent, Chapter, Hymn, V/R from the Ordinary. Antiphon on Magnificat & Collect from the Proper of the Season (C224).

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LENTEN READING


It is an old tradition of the Eastern Orthodox monastics to read the Ladder of Divine Ascent by St. John Climacus once over the period of Lent. Though I certainly recommend this practice, for a newbie “The Ladder” can be quite shocking. One is entering a world VERY different from todays world when reading “The Ladder.”

ladderofdivineascent

The Book is available online in the free translation by Archimandrite Lazarus Moore.

The Ladder of Divine Ascent

A reading schedule may be found below:

Week Day Reading
First Monday 1:1-27
  Tuesday 2-3: 1-29
  Wednesday 4:1-22
  Thursday 4:23-34
  Friday 4:35-71
 
Second Monday 4:72-112
  Tuesday 4:113-126 / 5:1-18
  Wednesday 5:19-42
  Thursday 6 / 7:1-31
  Friday 7:32-70
 
Third Monday 8:1-29 / 9
  Tuesday 10 /11 / 12
  Wednesday 13 /14
  Thursday 15:1-41
  Friday 15:42-75
   
Fourth Monday 15:76-81 / 16
  Tuesday 17 / 18 / 19
  Wednesday 20 / 21 22: 1-28
  Thursday 22:29-46 23:1-37
  Friday 23:38-52 / 24:1-34
 
Passion Week Monday 25:1-51
  Tuesday 25:52-69 / 26:1:27
  Wednesday 26:28-88
  Thursday 26:89-139
  Friday 26:140-189 26:154-170
 
Holy Week Monday 26a:1-65 / 27:1-16
  Tuesday 27:17-56
  Wednesday 27:57-87 / 28:1-16
  Thursday 28:17-64
  Friday 29 / 30: 1-end
 
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The Pre-Lenten Collects


The Collects such as they are found in the Anglican Breviary are taken from the Book of Common Prayer. They are not simply translations of the pre-Reformation Collects but rather compositions especially designed for the Prayer Book. But before we get to looking at the pre-Lenten Collects let us get a better idea of what kinds of things collects are.

The Nature of Collects

St. John Mason Neale provides the following description of the nature of a collect:

A Collect, then, is (1) a liturgical prayer; (2) must be short; (3) embraces but one main petition; (4) consists but of one sentence; (5) asks through the merits of our LORD; and (6) ends properly with an ascription of praise to the Blessed TRINITY.

St. John Mason Neale, “The Collects of the Church,” Essays on Liturgiology and Churh History, p. 49.

A Collect can be considered as “collecting” themes from the Epistle and Gospel of the Mass for that day, or, more likely in Neale’s opinion: “in it the priests collects the wishes and supplications of the by-standing faithfull (ibid p. 49).”

The BCP Collects

It must first be noted that in the Book of Common Prayer, the collect supplies the place of the pre-Reformation secrets and postcommunions. The Mass as it is contained in the Prayer Book is much simplified and to enter the mystery of Scripture – as presented in the propers – prayerfully, one merely needs the collect to do so. The collect, then, is a very important element in the book that has the word “prayer” in its very title. The Prayer Book seeks to prayerfully enter the world of Scripture so that we may “hear, read, mark, learn and inwardly digest it.” The collects for the Season of Advent were especially constructed for the Book of Common Prayer and collect their theme from the Epistles and Gospels for the Sundays in Advent. The same is true for the collects of the pre-Lenten Sundays.

Septuagesima. For Septuagesima Sunday the key phrase of the collect is “we, … may be mercifully delivered.” Sin is here presented as a captivity from which we need to be freed and from which it is impossible to free ourselves. “O Lord, we beseech thee, favourably to hear the prayers of thy people.” The “hearing” is not simply a mere hearing. The hearing which God is “beseeched” to grant is an active regarding and listening to us who pray and to what we are praying. “Justly punished.” The Latin BCP uses “affligimur” which is the first-person plural present passive indicative of afflīgō rather than “punished” (poenio or punio). The word affligimur has connotations of being “thrown down” which is an interesting perspective from which to describe sin considering that in the week of Septuagesima the story of creation and fall are read (in the 1922 revised calendar). Sin involves fall. There is much to be said here, but I must stop with this hint. The punishment is “just” which means that we deserve it. We have earned it. We have “fallen” from a previous height of existence with God to a lower depth of living in sin. The “captivity” of living in the depths of sin is a self-imposed one that we are unable to free ourselves from. With nehemia we ought to say: “Howbeit thou art just in all that is brought upon us; for thou hast done right, but we have done wickedly (Neh. 9, 33).” We are therefore in need of God’s “Merciful deliverance.” 

Sexagesima. Again the collect is taken from the Epistle and Gospel. The example here is St. Paul the Apostle. He serves as the example of the proper human response to our sinfulness and God’s saving grace. Paul is of all the Saints we know from Scripture one exceeding in “good works.” Yet none of them are what “saved” him from the captivity of sin. His works are not rungs on a ladder to climb up from where he is to from where humanity fell.

The key phrase here could perhaps be said to be “Mercifully grant that by thy power we may be defended against all adversity.” The emphasis falls here because a seemingly small, but all-important, change was here made in what was the pre-Reformed Sexagesima collect. In the traditional collect the means – or power – which God uses to defend us is precisely St. Paul himself. The traditional phrase ran as follows: “Mercifully grant that by the protection of the Teacher of the Gentiles we may be defended …” St. John Mason Neale speculates that this clause “which from its very nature, is not of remote antiquity, and which manifestly, has reference to S. Paul, as related in the Epistle (Essays, p. 54-55).

In the fifth section (aptly named martyrs and other saints) of The Origins of Feasts, Fasts and Seasons in Early Christianity, Paul Bradsaw and Maxwell Johnson describe the nature of early Christian veneration of martyrs. From as early as – at least – the second century Christians would venerate martyrs an ask their help, expecting to get it. It would seem that the nature of what the traditional phrase contains is very similar to Christian practice and belief of “remote antiquity” – presuming that the second century qualifies as such. The Gregorian Sacramentary (10the century) contains the Sexagesima collect in its traditional form and this form may wel go back much further.

Either way God’s power to defend is confessed in both collects. The Reformed version, by excising Paul from the collect, limits God’s power whereas the traditional collect would extend God’s power to use Paul for His purposes even after the Apostle has died. Death does not limit God, it limits us, creatures, but in Christ death has been conquered and shows its limits by the Christian “communion of saints.” In the old collect death is limited, whereas the Reformers adaptation of the collect has the unfortunate (and unintended) effect of limiting God.

Quinquagesima. This collect is an entirely new one. Not an adapted version of a pre-reformed collect. In Neale’s estimation the Prayer Book collect is “a manifest improvement of the Office (Essays, p. 55).” The key note, Neale suggests, “is, and ought to be; ‘The greatest of these is charity:’ but to that charity the Sarum Collect makes not the slightest reference (Essays, p. 55).” Neale picks up on the proper Epistle for Quinquagesima and sees it much  better represented in the Prayer Book collect when compared to the traditional collect which ran: “Graciously hear our prayers, we beseech thee, O Lord: that we, being loosed from the chain of our sins, may be kept from all things that may hurt us.” Indeed compared to the Prayer Book collect the traditional one simply falls flat.

We do not tire of affirming that God is “love.” But perhaps, so as to undo this phrase from its banality, we should say God is “charity.” This charity is a gift of the Holy Ghost, and is the bond of peace and of all virtues. Which is to say, that charity is what binds us together as creatures, and which unites to to God. Uplifts us to God. Charity is the ladder by which we ascend from the depth of sin to the heights of perfection (The Rule, chapter 73, St. Benedict of Nursia). It is God, giving Himself to us as Charity, by which we return to the place from which humanity fell.

Fr. Gregory Wassen

 

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February 11 to 17 ~ 2018


On all three Pre-Lenten Sundays (but not on weekdays) the Proper Invitatory and the winter hymn are used.The Alleluia is omitted from Compline on the Saturday before Septuagesima until Compline on Saturday before Easter. The Laus, tibi Domine is used instead. On double feasts antiphons are said entire before and after the Psalm or Canticle. Responds at Matins are from the Proper of the Season (C-section) unless instructed otherwise. 

 

February 11, Quinquagesima, Sunday of II Class, sd.


Psalms/antiphons from Psalter at all Hours.

At Matins, Proper Invitatory and Hymn for Pre-Lent
from the Ordinary, and Nocturn versicles through
the year are said.  Lessons and responds from C197-200).

At Lauds, Psalms of “Lauds 2” are said. Antiphons from Proper of the Season (C200).

Commem. The Vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Lourdes (Ant. on Ben., & Collect E96). 

At Vespers, Commem. The Vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Lourdes (Ant. on Magn., E97 Collect E976), & The Seven Holy Founders (E97). 

February 12, The Seven Holy Founders,d.

At Matins. Inv. & Hymn from Common 10. By Rule 1. Pss. & antiphons of the feria. Nocturn verses as in the Psalter. Lessons i-ii occurrent Scripture, lesson iii Legend of the The Seven Holy Founders (E98-99), Responds C202. Te Deum. 

At Lauds. Pss. from scheme 1, antiphons as in the Psalter. From Chapter of the Feast using Common 10 except what is given in the Proper (E99). Collect E97.

At Vespers. From Chapter of the Feast using Common 10, except what is given in the Proper (E99-100, E97).

February 13, Feria.

All as in the Psalter & Ordinary at all Hours except:

At Matins. Lessons & Responds from C202-203. 

NOTE: Some portions of Genesis, Exodus, Jeremiah, and Tobit long since omitted from the Breviary have been restored in the form of Matin Responsories during the weeks when those books are in reading, so as to continue the Scriptural narrative by this means (Explanations and Acknowledgments, p. ix). These are indicated by the square brackets […] around them. 

At Vespers. From Chapter of the Feast of St. Valentine, using Common 5 except for what is given in the Proper of the Saints (E100). 

February 14, THE FIRST DAY OF LENT, Commonly called Ash Wednesday, Priviliged Feria.

The complete Lenten propers are not begun until Quadragesima, which Sunday, marks the original beginning of Lent; hence on this and the other Ferias, through None of the following Saturday, everything is said as  during the Pre-Lenten Season, except for the Preces, which are now said daily in the ferial Office at all the Hours, through wednesday in Holy Week.

The Office is of the feria, with commemoration of St. Valentine.

At Matins. Lessons & Responsories from C203-204). The legend of St. Valentine is added to Lesson iii as a parenthetical note (E100).

At Lauds. scheme 2. Pss/antiphons from the Psalter. Ant. on Ben., & Collect from Proper of the Season rest as in the Psalter & Ordinary. Commemoration of St. Valentine (Table 5b, Collect E100). 

At Vespers. Commemoration of Sts. Faustinus and Jovita (Table 6a, Collect E100). 

February 15, Feria, Non-priviliged Feria.

At Matins. Lessons & Responsories from C205-206). The legend of Sts. Faustinus & Jovita is added to Lesson iii as a parenthetical note (E100).

At Lauds. scheme 2. Pss/antiphons from the Psalter. Ant. on Ben., & Collect from Proper of the Season rest as in the Psalter & Ordinary. Commemoration of St. Faustinus & Jovita (Table 6b, Collect E100-101). 

At Vespers. All as in the Psalter & Ordinary except what is given as proper for the season (C206).

February 16, Feria. 

 At Matins. All as in the Ordinary & Psalter. Lessons from the Proper of the Season (C206-207). 

At Lauds.  Scheme 2. Antiphon on Benedictus & Collect p. C206. Preces. 

At Vespers. All as in the Psalter & Ordinary, except what is given as proper for the Season (C208). 

The Saturday Office of Our Lady is not to be celebrated, or even commemorated in occurence if the Saturday be a day in Lent (p. G1). 

February 17, Feria.

At Matins. All as in the Ordinary & Psalter. Lessons from the Proper of the Season (C208-209). 

At Lauds.  Scheme 2. Antiphon on Benedictus & Collect p. C209. Preces. 

On this day, and thereafter until Holy Saturday, except on Sunday, Vespers is by ancient rules, said before the principal meal of midday, even on feasts. 

At Vespers. Antiphons and Pss. as in the Psalter, Chapter from Lauds. Hymn and V. / R. for Lent from the Ordinary. Preces. Collect from Lauds. Commemoration of St. Simeon (Table 5a, Collect E101). 

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Gesima Sundays


The three Sundays before Lent begin with Septuagesima, continue with Sexgesima, and conclude with Quinquagesima. They each put us in orbit around the theme of Easter. Septuagesima places us 70 days away from Easter, Sexagesima, 60, and Quinquagesima 50 days. The numbers don’t add up precisely, but that is besides the point. This is not about mathematics so much as about theology.

“The Lord said unto Adam, Of the tree which is in midst of paradise thou shalt not eat, * for in the day that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die.”

“The Lord said unto Noah: The end of all flesh is come before me: * make thee an ark of wood, that thereby the seed of all flesh may be saved.”

“Mighty Abraham, the father of our faith, * offered a burnt offering upon the altar, instead of his son.”

These are the 1st Vespers antiphon on the Magnificat of the three pre-Lenten Sundays. Fr. Pius Parsch inists that these three Sundays are “propaganda” in the best possible sense of that word. The proclaim the essence of the Gospel story which finds its core in the Cross and Resurection of Jesus Christ.

Creation and Fall, Divine Judgment and Salvation, Salvation by Faith in the sacrifice of the Cross. The Breviary readings for these Sundays and the days of the week following are calibrated to proclaim this story.

“The Kingdom of Heaven is like unto a man that is an householder: * which went out early in the morning to hire labourers into his vineyard, saith the Lord.”

The householder saith unto the labourers, Why stand ye here all the day idle? They say unto him, Because no man hath hired us. * Go ye also into the vineyard, and whatsoever is right, I will give you.”

The Septuagesima Gospel is highlighted by the antiphons on the Benedictus and the Magnificat of the 2nd Vespers. We are all called as hired labourers into the Lord’s vineyard. Young or old, male and female, everyone. The proclamation of the saving Gospel of Jesus Christ is every Christian’s job. There are, of course, different ways to do so. Most of us can at least, or ought to at least, manage to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ by how we live. We proclaim by what we do and do not do. Our very lifestyle ought to be an exegesis of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

“When much people were gathered together unto Jesus, and were come to him out of every city, he spake by a parable: * A sower went out to sow his seed.”

“Unto you it is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom of God, * but to others in parables, said Jesus unto his disciples.”

Sexagesima: The seed sown is the “word of God” – Scripture. Our proclamation, even by how we live our lives, is an exegesis of Scripture. This is why the legends of the saints are read on their feast days. They are a an interpretation of Scripture made by our lifestyles. The sower of the seed is God (the Father). The word he sows is contained in the Bible, but is even more than that. It is Jesus Christ – the Son of the Father. The Son is sown in our hearts and whether the seed grows (whether or not Christ is formed in us) depends on our response. The different soils into which the seed falls are the different kinds of responses that we could give to hearing (receiving) the word of God (seeds) proclaimed (sowing).

“Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and all things that are written by the Prophets concerning the Son of Man shall be accomplished: * for he shall be delivered unto the Gentiles, and shall be mocked, and spitted on; and they shall scourge him, and put him to death; and the third day he shall rise again.”

“And Jesus stood, and commanded him to be brought unto him, saying: What wilt thou that I should do unto thee? And he made answer: Lord that I may receive my sight. * And Jesus said unto him: Receive thy sight; thy faith hath saved thee. And immediately he received his sight, and followed him, glorifying God.”

Quinquagesima: The seed sown needs the soil of faith to do its work. Salvation is, as Protestants remind us, by faith. But it is not mere faith that the Lord is seeking in response to His message. The Lord is looking for repentance an about face. A radical re-orienting of our lives. Where we have until now been oriented toward vice, we are now to be oriented toward virtue. Repentance entails a complete change of lifestyle. Christianity is an all-or-nothing kind of thing, as Catholics remind us. The life of faith is a life that glorifies God.

The Gospel antiphons also give us some insight into what the fall has resulted into, and what the cure will effect in us. By the fall we have become blind. Blindness is an allegory for ignorance. We have become ignorant of God. The Gospel provides a way to heal the blindness, to regain the knowledge of God. To become knowers of God rather than ignoramuses of God.  Digging a little deeper the Christian faith tells us that as human beings we are created after or in the Image of God. The fall (Septuagesima) distorts this aspect of our being. We become fragmented internally and incapable of knowing ourselves such as we really are and incapable of knowing the world in which we live as it really is and, most importantly, we are incapable of knowing God such as He is really is.

As created in or after the Image of God – Evagrius tells us – we are logikoi (reasonable or more precisely logos-like beings). This comes from the Greek word logos which can mean “reason” but also “word” such as the Logos or Word of God thereby indicating the Second Person of the Trinity. The fall causes a “falling-apart” of our being. We become divided into nous (that part of us wherewith we maintain some relation to God and whereby some – distorted – knowledge of God remains possible), the thumikon (that part of us whereby we can become agitated) and the epithumikon (that part of us with which we desire). The thumikon and epithumikon are the means by which our nous (the part which “knows”) has the ability to know things. When thumikon and epithumikon function erratically (which is caused by the fall) the knowledge the nous has is equally distorted. Faith – specifically Christian faith – heals the thumikon and epithumikon so that by faith we are indeed, both, healed and saved at once! By faith we know ourselves, the world in which we live, and God. Once again we are logikoi or after/in the Image of God. This process is what the Eastern part of the Church calls deification or theosis.

The life of faith that glorifies God is the kind of life in which our being is gradually (by grace) restored. Healed. Virtues (God’s list of do’s for us) also medicine to us, just like vices (sin) are the devil’s poison for us. To live virtuously is not an extra to faith. Virtuous living is what the life of faith is. Belief and practice are united in faith. This is a life-long process. The question is not so much where we find ourselves on this life-long journey, but whether we continue – in grace – to make progress.

Fr. Gregory Wassen

Posted in Anglican Breviary, Sin & Salvation, theology | Leave a comment

February 4 to 10 ~ 2018


On all three Pre-Lenten Sundays (but not on weekdays) the Proper Invitatory and the winter hymn are used.The Alleluia is omitted from Compline on the Saturday before Septuagesima until Compline on Saturday before Easter. The Laus, tibi Domine is used instead. On double feasts antiphons are said entire before and after the Psalm or Canticle. Responds at Matins are from the Proper of the Season (C-section) unless instructed otherwise. 

 

February 4, Sexagesima, Sunday of II Class, sd.


Psalms/antiphons from Psalter at all Hours.

At Matins, Proper Invitatory and Hymn for Pre-Lent
from the Ordinary, and Nocturn versicles through
the year are said.  Lessons and responds from C188- 191).

At Lauds, Psalms of “Lauds 2” are said. 

Commem. St. Gilbert of Sempringham (S12, Table 9b). 

At Vespers, Commem. of St. Agatha (E84, 87) & St. Gilbert (S12, Table 9c). 

February 5, St. Agatha, Virgin & Martyr, d. 

At Matins. Inv. & Hymn from Common 12. Pss. from Common 5 at all three Nocturns, except the ninth which is given in its proper place (E86). Antiphons from Proper. Lessons of Noct. I from Common 13, responds from Proper, Lessons & Responds of Noct. II from Proper, Lessons of Noct. III from Common 12, series 3, Responds from Proper. Te Deum. 

At Lauds. Antiphons from Proper, Pss. of Sunday. Chapter, V/R, Antiphon on Ben., and Collect from Proper. Hymn Jesus, corona virginum from Common 12. 

At Vespers. Antiphons from Lauds, Pss. from Vespers 6. From Chapter of the following feast (St. Titus, using Common 7) with a commem. of the preceding (St. Agatha), concluded with a commemoration of St. Dorothy, Virgin and Martyr (Table 12a, E87). 

February 6, St. Titus, Bishop & Confessor, d. 

At Matins. By rule 1. Inv. & Hymn from Common 7. One Nocturn. Pss/antiphons/Nocturn Veriscles from the Psalter. Lessons i-ii occurent Scripture. Nocturn Versicles from Psalter. Lesson iii, Legend of St. Titus (E88) with Legend of St. Dorothy immediately following. Te Deum.

At Lauds. Scheme 1. Antiphons/Pss as in the Psalter (antiphons are doubled). From Chapter of Common 7, Collect from Proper. Commemoration of St. Dorothy Table 12b, E88). 

At Vespers. From Chapter of following (St. Romuald, E88 & Common 10), Collect from Proper, with commemoration of preceding (St. Titus, Table 7c, E87). 

February 7, St. Romuald, Abbot, d. 

At Matins. By rule 1. Inv. & Hymn from Common 10. One Nocturn. Pss/antiphons from Psalter. Lesson iii, Legend of St. Romuald. Te Deum. 

At Lauds. scheme 1. Pss/antiphons (doubled) from the Psalter. From Chapter of the Feast using Common 10. Collect from Proper. 

At Vespers. From Chapter of following (St. John of Matha, using Common 9), Collect from Proper, with commemoration of preceding (St. Romuald, Table 10c, E88). 

February 8, St. John of Matha, Confessor, d. 

At Matins. By Rule 1. Inv. & Hymn from Common 9. One Nocturn. Pss/antiphons from Psalter. Lesson iii, legend of St. John of Matha. Te Deum.

At Lauds. scheme 1. Pss/antiphons from Psalter. From Chapter of the Feast using Common 9. Collect from Proper. 

At Vespers. From Chapter of following (St. Cyril of Alexandria, using Common 8), Collect from Proper, with commemoration of preceding (St. John of Matha. Table 9c, E89), followed by a commemoration of St. Apollonia (Table 12a, E90).

February 9, St. Cyril of Alexandria, Bishop, Confessor, Doctor, d. 

 At Matins. By rule 1. Inv. & Hymn from Common 8. One Nocturn. Pss/antiphons from Psalter. Lesson iii Legend of St. Cyril followed immediately by the Legend of St. Apollonia. Te Deum. 

At Lauds. Pss/antiphons from Psalter. From chapter of the Feast using Common 8. Collect from Proper (E90). Commemoration of St. Apollonia (Table 12b)

At Vespers. From the Chapter of the following (St. Scholastica) using Common 12, Collect from Proper, with commemoration of preceding (St. Cyril, Table8c, E90). 

February 10, St. Scholastica, V., d. 

All from Common 12, except:

At Matins.  Three Nocturns. Lessons i-iii from occurent Scripture, Responds as given for the Season. Lesson iv-vi Legend of St. Scholastica, divided at the * symbols to form three lessons (responds from Common 12). Lessons vi-ix & Responds from Common 12 series 1. Te Deum.

At Lauds. Collect from Proper (E91). 

At Vespers. All as in the Ordinary and Psalter, Chapter and Collect from Lauds of Quinquagesima (C200), Ant., on Magn., C197. Commemoration of the Vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Lourdes (E92), followed by a commemoration of St. Scholastica (Table 12c, E91). 

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Epiphany (ii)


“We make this assertion because this is what the liturgy itself tells us, in the very acts of making us manifest and like to Christ. The manifestation and full meaning of Christ to the world is given in the Christmas cycle of the liturgy, beginning with the feast of the Nativity, the Incarnation itself. This feast was originally kept on January 6th, but probably following the arguments of Sextus Julius Africanus (supposedly relating the records of the Roman censuses to the birth of Christ), the actual birth of Christ was redated to December 25. Gueranger reports that the Holy See ‘obliged all Churches to keep the Nativity on this date [nevertheless] the Sixth of January was not robbed of its glory.’ So important was the date of the feast on the 6th of January, however, that the established feast on that date remained, in both the East and the West. We might say that the historical considerations were subordinated to their anagogical and theological significance, but this would not be quite correct, for the keeping of the Nativity as the actual birth of Christ was already subordinate to two other significations of the feast (so much so, that it gets no mention in the liturgies of the East) is the appearance of the wise men or Magi from the East, the so-called ‘three kings’.”

Laurence Paul Hemming, Worship as a Revelation, p. 164.

 

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