Category Archives: Anglican Breviary

Amalarius and the biblical roots of the Divine Office (i)


Amalarius (or Amalar) of Metz mentions that the Church celebrates four offices during the day and four during the night. The latter four he also calls “vigils.” This pattern of four per part of the day are biblically grounded via … Continue reading

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The Psalms, are first, midst and last.


“David is first, midst, and last.” This phrase is (erroneously) attributed to St. John Chrysostom and can be found cited in St. John Mason’s Neale’s Commentary on the Psalms (Vol. 1). The importance of Psalmody for Christians can be easily deduced … Continue reading

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Reflecting on Continuous Psalmody in the Anglican Breviary


The pre-Pius X Breviary largely distributed the Psalter over Matins and Vespers throughout the week. Most of the Psalms from Psalm 1 to 109 were read at Matins and most of the Psalms from 110-147 were read at Vespers. This … Continue reading

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Plato’s Dualism (iii) ~ The Divided Line


Another way of approaching the subject addressed in the Allegory of the Cave is that of the Divided Line. The latter, in fact precedes the former in Plato’s Republic: “Conceive then,” said I, “as we were saying, that there are … Continue reading

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Plato’s Dualism (ii)~ the Cave


There are two famous expressions of Plato’s supposed dualism: the allegory of the cave the allegory of the divided line It is time we addressed these famous expression of the theory of forms and its apparent dualism. This post will … Continue reading

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Levels of Being


Parmenides provided us a view of reality where there are only two choices: something either is or is not. In his view it makes no sense to speak of “levels of being” it is preposterous. Plato, however, recognizes an “in between” which … Continue reading

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Sunday Trinity XV


Today is the XVth Sunday after Trinity or Trinity XV. As most Sundays Trinity XV is a Semidouble. The liturgical color is green. The Octave of the Nativity of the BVM is Simple so that nothing is said of the … Continue reading

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