St. Cyril of Jerusalem


Friday March 18

St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Ember Friday in Lent

Matins: III Nocturns

I: Scripture from Common 8, II: Legend from Proper (E117, * indicates the end of the Lesson and therefore the point at which the Respond – Common 8 – is inserted), III: from Common 8, but Lesson ix is (Lesson iii or entire Homily) from the Ember Friday.

Alternatively Matins can be said by Rule 2. If Matins is said by Rule 2 the Ember Friday is not commemorated in Matins.

Lauds: of Lauds 1, no Preces, Collect E116, Commem. of Ember Friday (C221, A22, C221).

Preces are never said on Doubles! Even if a Double is merely commemorated.

Little Hours: as in the Psalter (no Preces), Prime as for a Feast, Collect E116.

Vespers: 1st Vespers of St. Joseph, all from the Feast (E118-19), Commem. St. Cyril (Table 8c, E116), Commem. Feria (C221, A42, C221).

Compline: of Sunday

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About Father Gregory

I am an Anglican Catholic Priest, currently residing in Orvelte, the Netherlands.
This entry was posted in Anglican Breviary, Liturgical Year, Ordo, Rubrics. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to St. Cyril of Jerusalem

  1. Compline is of Sunday due to the fact that St. Joseph is commemorated “after sun down”, correct? One thing I don’t understand is why we commemorate the feria of the following day after sun down (using Jewish reckoning) yet use the current day’s Psalms. Any idea why?

    • fathergregory says:

      Excellent questions! Please ignore my earlier answer – it was far from clear.
      A feria is reckoned according to the Roman reckoning from Midnight to Midnight and therefore begins at Matins and ends with Compline. A Feast is reckoned according to the Jewish reckoning and begins with Vespers and ends with Vespers – thus feasts can have 1st and 2nd Vespers (Compline, strictly speaking, “belongs” to the Vespers preceding it see Anglican Breviary p. xxix).

      Compline is of Sunday due to the fact that St. Joseph is commemorated “after sun down”, correct?

      Compline is of Sunday because it is part of the Feast of St. Joseph which began with Vespers. It is not related to “sun down” – after all Vespers is a late afternoon Office and not necessarily an Office related to “sun down.”

      One thing I don’t understand is why we commemorate the feria of the following day after sun down (using Jewish reckoning) yet use the current day’s Psalms. Any idea why?

      Remember the feria is reckoned from Midnight to Midnight not Evening to Evening. The ferial Psalms for Friday begin with Friday Matins and end with Friday Compline. The Ember Friday is ferial and because it is a Greater Feria (Lent) it must be commemorated if a Feast outranks it. The Feast (St. Joseph) begins with Vespers and operates on a different reckoning as does Ember Friday. The Ember Friday ends at Midnight so that its commemoration is not of the following but of the current (ferial) day. Yet the Office is not of the feria (so that the ferial Psalms are not used) but of the Feast (so that the festal Psalms are used) having a mere commemoration of the feria.

      • Mark of the Vineyard says:

        Many thanks for the clarification!

        Just a few more questions concerning Compline, which I never really got around to completely understanding:

        – When the rubrics of the Propers say of Compline “Commemoration of feria”, that means then that the Psalms to be said are of the feira, correct?

        – I’ve yet to encounter a case where the rubrics of the Propers indicate different a Hymn for Compline other than the Te Lucis. The rubrics for it, though, seem to indicate that there are such cases. Are there really?

        – My greatest confusion is with the Preces. I still don’t know when they’re to supposed to de ferial or dominical (though I am aware that it is related to Vespers).

        – As Lent is a penitential season I take it that the Preces are to be said always even when the feast is a double (as ferial preces)? Are they said on Sundays?

        I appologize for all the questions, but the general rubrics of the Breviary are a bit hard to follow sometimes and don’t explain everything.

      • fathergregory says:

        You are welcome! If you will allow me, I will answer your questions in a blog-post rather than a comment. It seems to me that you are not alone in pondering these things!

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